MPA57sst-ATACS Defender

MPA57sst-ATACS Defender

When a press release comes to us, and it’s something interesting enough to share, we do so. Sometimes I’ll just put up the press release as it’s sent to us. Other times I’ll do my own write up and include important bits of information. For this one I’m going to post the press release first and then comment on it.

Press Release:

MasterPiece Arms Introduces New MPA57sst-ATACS Defender Semi-Auto

Carrollton, GA (July 2012) – MasterPiece Arms, manufactures of the MPA MAC Line of semi-auto submachine pistols and carbines, is pleased to introduce the new MPA57sst-ATACS Defender semi-auto. Based on the successful, standard MAC design, the new MPA57sst-ATACS is available in a 5-inch fixed barrel pistol with A-TACS hydrographic coating. Available in 5.7x28mm with 20-round magazines standard, the MPA57sst-ATACS features a threaded barrel with ½ x 28 threads making it suppressor ready.

The MPA57sst-ATACS Defender Semi-Auto will come with adjustable sights, a side-cocker, scope mount and muzzle break and features all the accuracy, low recoil and performance expected from the Masterpiece Arms Defender series. MSRP will be $659.99.

 

 

My Thoughts:
Let me start by saying I’ve only seen what was shared above relating to this gun. I’ve never seen, held, or fired one in person.

With an MSRP of a penny under $660 this gun doesn’t look like something I would envision from a company with “masterpiece” in their name. The lines of this firearm are far from beautiful. The trigger guard doesn’t attach to the grip, which looks cheap to me. It looks like they skimped on the texturing for the grip, furthering the look of something not well thought out. The cocking mechanism is located on the left side of the gun, which effectively eliminates all lefties from being able to easily handle their firearm.

When I buy I firearm I’m looking for value. At the price they’re asking I do not see value in comparison to other $660 firearms. Am I just too caught up on the looks of this gun? What are your thoughts?

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Chiappa Rhino

Chiappa Rhino

Every trip to the gun store is a chance to see something new and different. Although I’ve seen the Chiappa Rhino a few times before, the design of this self-defense handgun has been stuck in my mind for the past few days.

One of the first things you’ll probably notice about this gun is that the bullet is fired from the bottom of the cylinder, not the top, and that the barrel is therefore located lower than you would expect from a revolver. This design, according to the manufacturer, helps to reduce muzzle flip, recoil, and increases “natural point ability.”

I haven’t had a chance to try one of these at the range, but next time I do I’ll be sure to try out all three available calibers (.357 mag, .40 S&W, 9 mm).

My only concern with this revolver is that the grip seems more artistic than practical. I like to have a solid grip when I’m shooting, and at a glance I’m not sure I would. Does anyone have any experience with the Chiappa Rhino?

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Capacity or Concealment

Capacity or Concealment

Often times the more concealable handguns require a single stack magazine or a shortened double stack, which in turn means less ammo available should you need to use it to defend yourself.

How many people favor a more concealable handgun at the expense of ammo capacity when they concealed carry?

 

 

 

 

 

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Sig Sauer 556 Meets Gears of War

Sig Sauer 556 Meets Gears of War

Or perhaps it’s the other way around? The first time I saw a Sig Sauer 556 on the wall of one of my local gun shops (they actually had a few of them) I couldn’t help but think how badass it looked and how much it looked like something out of a movie or video game.

After a very brief internet search it looks like the Sig Sauer 556 lineup was introduced at the 2006 SHOT Show. Gears of War also made its appearance in 2006.

  

Is this a random coincident? Is this a chicken or the egg conundrum? Do they look nothing alike and I’m seeking connections that aren’t there? Does anyone have one and wants to let me shoot it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NAA Black Jack Revolver

NAA Black Jack Revolver

I was in one of my local gun shops yesterday and I saw this little pocket pistol; a North American Arms Black Jack revolver in .22 mag. As you can probably guess from the first image, this is a limited edition gun, but one made as much for shooting as it is for collecting.

Featuring a 1 1/8 inch  ported barrel, a birdshead grip frame, laminated rosewood grips and a distinctive black carbon coating. While it doesn’t have the fancy engraving you can see on some collectibles, it does have incredible rosewood grips that you really do need to see in person to fully appreciate. With a production run limited to 1,500 these will become hard to find quickly.

Could you see yourself with this pocket pistol?

 

 

 

 

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9mm vs .40

9mm vs .40

I was recently talking with my cousin about handguns, as he’s thinking about purchasing one for self-defense purposes, and the subject of caliber came up.

A friend of his had been promoting the Springfield XDM .40, and as a result he was leaning in that direction. I asked him what the draw was for a .40 vs. a 9mm, and his response was stopping power. He then proceeded to tell me a story about a Philippine uprising in which the militants were doped up and it required the stopping power of a .40, not a 9mm to put them down.

Now I can appreciate a good story as much as the next guy, but there are several key issues worth bringing up. First is that he’s looking for a handgun for self-defense, not for putting down insurgencies (in which case a rifle would probably be better anyhow). Second, if someone is so doped up their brain isn’t registering the damage you’re in trouble no matter what. Third, and most important in my opinion, is that it’s all about shot placement.

If you’re able to put several quality self-defense rounds into a person’s chest, the chances of them stopping are high. This in turn brings us back to the ever important issue of regular practice. As he hasn’t been shooting in a while he’ll probably want to practice a lot before he feels confident carrying a firearm. Like most of us he has bills to pay and mouths to feed, so cost is an important factor. A basic truth is that you can usually purchase 9mm ammo for less than .40 ammo, which means more bullets to practice with.

I know it’s easy for such a topic to quickly turn into a war on preference, rumor, and speculation, but I would like to hear from any of you on this if there’s something more I should bring up to my cousin while he’s making his purchase decision.

 

 

 

 

 

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