Full-Auto Handguns

Full-Auto Handguns

 

 Last night before heading to bed my wife and I were talking about full-auto handguns. She felt they would be a great weapon in a zombie apocalypse and I strongly disagreed. This morning I read an article in Guns&Ammo by Patrick Sweeney relating to full-auto handguns, and his experience with them lines up with what my thoughts on them have always been; they would be fun to shoot every now and again as a novelty, but they are not a practical weapon to have (especially during a zombie apocalypse scenario, yes, he stated that specifically).

I love shooting guns, and shooting any firearm that has full-auto capabilities is even more fun, but there comes a point in every shooter’s life when they start to ask some tough questions. These questions will range from “Should I purchase bullets or lunch?” all the way to “Does a full-auto handgun make sense when a submachine gun has so many more positive attributes?”

My opinion of full-auto handguns, or machine pistols, is that they were designed for a very specific situation or condition, but most of the time a submachine gun would still be a better choice. The one positive that machine pistols have is that they look like most other pistols, which in turn means people in general won’t freak out when they see police or security carrying them.

 

 The benefits of a submachine gun on the other hand far outweigh the “mundane” factor. As they were designed for full-auto fire, submachine guns usually have some way of bracing the weapon to better deal with recoil. Usually this is a stock of some sort but sometimes it’s a forward grip. This in turn makes them easier to be accurate with. Unless the point is suppression fire, hitting a target with more bullets is always a better than missing with more bullets.

Perhaps I’m getting old, but if I were given a choice of legally owning, or even just firing a full-auto pistol or a submachine gun, hands down I would go with the submachine gun. What are other people’s thoughts on this issue?

 

 

 

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Magpul CTR Buttstock Review

Magpul CTR Buttstock Review

Magpul’s CTR (Compact/Type Restricted) adjustable drop-in buttstock is a no-nonsense option for your AR15 platform. Although there are no storage compartments, cheek risers, or other extras you might find on other adjustable stocks, the four position, streamline A-frame design allows for light, fast action while preventing snagging and shielding the release latch. Other basic features of the CTR include a supplemental friction lock system that minimizes excessive stock movement as well as an ambidextrous QD sling mount that will accept any push-button sling swivel. A 0.30″ rubber butt-pad comes standard on the Mil-Spec Model to prevent slippage.

There are a few slight differences between the Mil-Spec and Commercial model to keep in mind should you decide to look into purchasing Magpul’s CTR.

Besides the standard differences in measurements between Mil-Spec and Commercial, the primary differences that could make a difference to you in favor of the Commercial Model is that the buffer tube has six positions to adjust to instead of four and the rubber butt-pad is 0.55″ thick instead of 0.30″ thick, which provides a little extra cushioning. These are small differences to be sure, but when customizing your AR15 it’s often the small things that make yours different from the other guy’s. Both models are made in the U.S.A. and will cost you about $80.

I have the Mil-Spec Model and have enjoyed it thoroughly. It was easy to install and is just as easy to use. It’s comfortable against my shoulder so I’m not too concerned about the slightly thicker rubber padding that I’m missing out on. I’m able to get the correct length with only four positions as opposed to six, but I can appreciate how six would be nice. Has anyone else tried one of these out on their rifles?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ruger .22 Single Six Review

Ruger .22 Single Six Review

 

When it comes to an inexpensive plinking gun, Ruger’s .22 Single Six fits the bill. Originally released in 1953 for $57.50, the Single Six has long since proven its value as an accurate and reliable .22 revolver. Although there is a lot of history behind this fine revolver, I’m only going to reference my personal experiences with it.

Several years back, my wife and I decided that we wanted to actively pursue shooting for recreation. I had experience with firearms due to my time in the military, but she was very new to them. I wanted to find a good starting gun that she could build up her confidence and skills on, so a .22 seemed like the natural choice. Some friends of ours have .22 semi-auto pistols and they had mentioned that failures of some sort or another are not uncommon. As such, a revolver once again seemed like the natural choice. After some internet searching, the Single Six began distinguishing itself as the perfect gun for our needs. Keep reading to find out more about what I liked about the Single Six.

 

Cost: As this was our first firearm, and my wife was just trying her hand at shooting, we decided to go the used route and paid a little under $200, where as a new Single Six typically costs between $400-$500. Since it shoots a .22 round, ammunition is incredibly inexpensive, which in turn makes regular practice both appealing and financially sustainable.

Accuracy: The revolver’s weight is just over 2 lbs and shoots a .22 lr round which results in recoil that is close to non-existent. Without having to worry about anticipating the recoil, both my wife and I could focus more on trigger pull. Being a single action revolver, you have to manually pull back the hammer for each shot. This simple action in turn forces you to slow down and make each shot more deliberate, which equates to better accuracy.

Reliability: The beautiful truth about revolvers is that they are as reliable as it gets. You don’t need to worry about the gun’s reliability so much as you do the ammo’s. Every time I pull the hammer back and squeeze the trigger the gun fires. The two times it hasn’t in the thousand or so rounds I’ve put through it have been due to dud ammo. A gun doesn’t get any more reliable than that.

Fun Factor: I enjoy this gun immensely. There’s something about pulling the hammer back with every shot that really makes you feel one with the gun… It’s a bonding experience of sorts. Cocking the hammer prepares the revolver physically and the shooter mentally. When I’m not at the range and at a safe shooting location, I do enjoy occasionally using the wildly inaccurate “fanning” technique. I’ve read this isn’t necessarily good for the gun, but I’ve watched too many Spaghetti Westerns and sometimes my inner Clint Eastwood needs to come out.

Zombie Factor: Zombies are known largely to shuffle, so at 7 yards I’m feeling pretty good with the Single Six.

 Are there any other Single Six owners out there? I would enjoy hearing your thoughts or stories involving this fine firearm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Silencers

Silencers

If you live in a state that allows the legal purchase and use of silencers, then it might be time to pay a tax that will bring you far more enjoyment than your April 15 taxes. In spite of Hollywood’s depiction of silencer usage, they are yet one more tool to help prevent hearing loss while enjoying shooting. If you don’t already know a good deal about silencers (and even if you do), continue reading to find out where your hard earned money will be going in the future. 

Personal Experience: My first hands on experience with a silencer was a few range trips back when I had the pleasure to try out my friend’s Ruger Mark III with sub-sonic ammo and a silencer (sadly I don’t recall the brand and model). Before this trip I had always been interested in silencers, but until recently they were illegal to use in Washington State. Silencers in movies are depicted as being “whisper” quiet, and I knew that was not the reality of shooting with a silencer. With my hearing protection on, standing in our lane station, the only sounds I heard were those coming from the slide as the gun ejected and chambered a new round as well as the sound of the casings hitting the concrete floor. It was one of the rare few occasions that my extensive movie viewing pastime didn’t set me up for disappointment.

It’s one thing to say that shooting with a silencer is quiet, but it doesn’t really bring it home like a video does. I did a little digging around YouTube and found this video of a guy shooting a Ruger Mark III with a silencer attached. I don’t know if he’s using sub-sonic ammo or not, but it gives you a pretty good idea of how quiet shooting can be.

 

Need to Know: After shooting with my friend’s silencer, my interest in owning my own went up a good deal. I knew that in addition to the actual cost of a silencer I would have to pay a $200 tax stamp, but I didn’t really know much past that. When you look into buying a silencer there will be two things you need to know (besides state legalities): The caliber and the thread size. Caliber is easy enough since it will be the same as the gun you’re buying it for. The thread size varies, but it’s easy to find out and you can always ask your local shop guy/gal for assistance with that. I found this next video (brought to you by the folks at silencershop.com) to be very helpful and informative relating to silencer attachment.

 

 If you happen to have a silencer or have used one, how was your experience with it? Was it everything you had hoped it would be or were you let down by it?

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FN FS2000

FN FS2000

 

When I think of futuristic, all around cool looking firearms that are available today, the FN FS2000 is at the top of my list.

The Basics:
The FN FS2000 is a semi-auto bullpup style rifle chambered in 5.56x45mm NATO (223 Rem.), and comes with a 1.6x optical sighting package. It’s gas operated and uses a rotating block lockup. The polymer stock is ambidextrous and fired casings are ejected through a forward port on the right side of the rifle away from the operator. Both 10 and 30 round magazines are available. The cost is approximately $2000.

The “11” Factor:
What gives the little extra push from ten to eleven, for me, is the way this rifle combines modular options, light weight, and beautiful lines… Oh, and the fact that our left-handed brothers and sisters won’t be getting a face full of hot gas and brass.

Would any of you consider buying a rifle that looks like something out of a sci-fi movie? Has anyone had a chance to fire one of these? If so, what were your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

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