Company Overview: Strike Industries

Company Overview:  Strike Industries

Strike Industries reached out to Gunblog.com about a few months and sent us a sample of their polymer products for us to take a look at.  We were lucky enough to receive a set of their 1911 grips, an iPhone cover,  and a non-polymer product, their pyramid angled rail adapter.  Well after playing with them for a while, its time to tell you guys (and girls) what we think, and why I’m not sending the 1911 grips back to them.

Ok, we know, there is a plethora of polymer gun products out there, and you’re probably asking what makes Strike Industries stand out.  For us, two things always grab our attention for any product–First it’s quality, second price.  The quality of the polymer used for Strike Industry’s products seems to be first rate.  They’re extremely rigid and can stand up to a significant amount of heat while still maintaining their durability; check out the video below to see an example of this durability.  Second the price is deceiving, I would expect a lesser quality product at the low price point Strike Industries offers.

Strike Industries is a homegrown company made up of hobbyists and gun enthusiasts who wanted to offer a different type of polymer, so they developed their own.  They believe what sets their polymer apart from others is the process in which they construct it–they directly inject the fibers into the polymer rather than mixing it or layering it.  They claim that the process is cheaper and produces a result that has a similar rigidity as the polymer used in popular 1911 G10 grips.  From my short time of handling their products, seeing the prices on their website, and viewing the videos, I see myself becoming a quick believer of their claims.  Take a look below to see what they sent us to play with.

Yes, of course, there has to be a tactical iPhone case if you make polymer, and Strike Industries is no exception.  Their iPhone case is a little different though; the tactical loop makes pulling it out of a mollle pouch and taking a quick phone call in between reloads a tad bit easier.  No, but seriously, if you do keep your phone in a molle pouch of some kind, or some deep pockets, it is quite handy.  The hexagonal engraving on the back looks pretty sweet too.  The phone also has complete functionality with all the buttons and camera functions.

 

The one non-polymer product they sent us was their Pyramid Angled Rail Adapter.  At first, it thought it was quite peculiar, but I could see a few rifle owners really liking this item.  It allows a user to mount a grip at a 17 degree angle either forward (for an AK style foregrip) or reward (for a MK43 style grip).  Although its main purpose is attaching grips at an angle, almost any picatinny accessory you wish to be at a 17 degree angle could be attached to it.

And now my absolute favorite accessory Strike Industries sent us, their 1911 grips.  When first contacted by Strike Industries, I checked out their website and looked at the grips.  I saw the price tag of 16 bucks and was expecting to get some sort of glorified gun show special grips.  Well, I was wrong, and I’m glad I was wrong.  The golf ball dimple grips they sent fit my 1911 full size perfectly, and more importantly, they felt spectacular when gripping it.  Their a little thicker than my other grips (not by very much), but I prefer the slight thickness since I have larger hands.  The only thing that over shines the quality of the polymer is the look the grips give my 1911–personally, I love it, and they’re staying on.

You can purchase the products shown here and see what else Strike Industries has to offer over at their website.  Their  products, particularly their 1911 grips, left an impression on me, and I’m anxious to see what they roll out with in the future (hint hint, high capacity magazines for the AR-15).

 

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New Gunblog.com Sponser: OnTargetAuctions.com

New Gunblog.com Sponser:  OnTargetAuctions.com

We would like to introduce you guys to a new gun auction website, and Gunblog.com’s newest advertiser, OnTargetAuctions.com.  There are a few online gun auction sites out there right now, but OnTargetAuctions.com puts a unique spin on the typical eCommerce world of auction sites.

We’re all pretty much familiar with online auctions; most of them are similar to Ebay.  If you’re the highest bid, and the price reserve is met, you win the item.  OnTargetAuctions.com has a sort of collective bidding system.  People pay for bids on the site and just use “bids” to bid on the item.  The person with the last bid, wins the item.  There are also auctions for bids themselves; so instead of paying about a dollar a bid, you can get 25 or 50 pack of bids on the cheap.

If you don’t win the item, and you placed a bunch of bids, those bids don’t necessarily go to waste.  You can apply those bids to purchase the item.  I’ve seen some guns go for pretty low prices.  The best deal I’ve seen so far has to be the Springfield XDm .45, and the winner probably paid less than $100 bucks in bids.  It’s sort of high risk/high reward system, but if you’re the tenacious bidder, you can come away with some crazy deals.  As the site grows, I’m sure the inventory and deals will too.  Check them out, and stay tuned to Gunblog.com as we’ll probably have some special deals available here for bid packs and items–expect a promo code soon.  Also, OnTargetAuctions.com is doing a giveaway this month so stay tuned for that too.  Be sure to check them out.

 

 

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Gamble Tactical LA Holsters

Gamble Tactical LA Holsters

Game TActical Holster Pics

A problem with having tactical accessories on your pistol is finding a holster that can accommodate it.  There are companies that make them, but prices are usually expensive and wait times are usually long.  Also, sometimes you’ll have to get a custom holster made to accommodate your specific setup.  One company is trying to help compact Glock owners make it easier to find a holster with their new LA Tactical Holster.

Gamble Tactical’s LA Tactical holster has a unique design that will allow an owner attach almost any light/laser to their Glock compact.  As you can see from the pictures, the complete underside of the holster is pretty much cut away, leaving it open.  The pistol is actually held in by a 3 point retention system–a small column that goes into the muzzle, an polymer strap that’s formed around where the backstrap meets the slide, and the areas around the triggerguard/frame.  The pistol is released when grabbing it; the top of your hand moves the strap which releases the gun from the holster.

Gamble Tactical’s holster is constructed from a glass reinforced nylon and can host a variety of belt clips.  The holster is also adjustable so it can provide specific cant that an owner may want.

Glock holster for bayonett

The design of the LA Holster has an obvious advantage–it provides a holster for those wanting to put accessories on their Glock 19 or 23.  However, from looking at the video below, it seems that it forces somewhat of a non traditional draw.  You have to come back a little bit then up, rather just just straight up as with most of the holsters currently on the market now.  But unlike most other holsters, you can’t attach any accessory you want, and/or switch out that accessory and still use the same holster. With a little training and some time getting used to it, I’m sure the unorthodox draw wouldn’t be a difficult obstacle to overcome.

Hopefully, Gamble Tactical will be offering their new innovative holster for more models of Glocks or even different manufacturers of pistols.  I’m sure there’s a market for the same type of holster that could accommodate other striker fired pistols such as the S&W M&Ps and the Springfield XDs (it would be difficult to make a similar holster for pistols with an external hammer such as a Sig P226).

For a light bearing holster, the price seems very reasonable at only 30 bucks and is available at the sportsmanguide.com.

 

 

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Costa Ludus goes live

Chris Costa’s new venture, Costa Ludus, has officially gone live with their new website launch this week.  CostaLudus.com allows you to sign up for Chris’s classes, see his training schedule and also highlights other services provided by Costa Ludus such as product test and evaluation.  I personally liked the training page, specifically his family history and his philosophy on the training he provides:

Due to my background, I found it fitting to choose the trident, shield and net to represent Costa Ludus. My family has been in the maritime industry for a very long time. My grandfather served in the Navy during World War 2; after the war, he was employed as a master rigger by Concordia Company, Inc. One of my uncles was a New England fisherman and tug engineer, while another uncle is a retired U.S. Coast Guard Vietnam veteran. My father retired from the U.S. Coast Guard with 20 years of service, and he is now a licensed Captain. I spent 12 years in the U.S. Coast Guard before joining the private sector at Applied Marine Technologies Inc. (AMTI).

Costa Ludus conducts training for the game of life, where the knowledge and skills learned in training may one day translate over to the streets or battlefield, determining life or death. We train others with the understanding that life is bigger than us. We understand the sacrifices that others make on a daily basis for our freedoms – that is why we take training so seriously.

Sincerely – Christopher Costa

The website is definitely worth checking out, and if you’re lucky enough to live near one of the areas on his training schedule, I would sign up–the prices may be a little higher but the quality of instruction will probably be the best you can get.

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